The idea is simple, make Korean inspired fast food. Kogi did it, but Seoul Sausage Company has done it with their own twist and style. Having won the Food Networks Great Food Truck Race #3 (A certificate is prominently displayed by the food pick up area), these guys know how to cook, market, and serve their clientele. 

The small storefront off Sawtelle has been open less than a year, but there are already regulars and lines out the door. The vibe is funky Asian, with hip music, kitschy anime toys, and a minimalist decor; you have a choice of eating at a stand up counter inside, nabbing one of the 8 seats at the picnic table outside, or taking your order to go. All the food is either wrapped in paper or delivered in paper boxes. This is an eco friendly place, but with their seven item menu and limited space, do not expect them to cater to your whimsical preferences.

I tried nearly half the menu, starting with their most popular ball, the Flaming Ball with DMZ sauce for $3. It’s a fried ball of rice, kimchi, cheese and served with a spicy dipping sauce.

If you like the Italian arancini di riso, this is a spicy Korean version. It was great plain without the sauce, but if you want to add a bit of spicy creaminess, the DMZ sauce is a great accompaniment.

Because it’s called the Seoul Sausage company, I had to try one of their sausages, so I went for the Galbi for $7. I was a bit apprehensive when I saw them pour a line of wasabi mayo onto the bun, but it wasn’t too much and it added just enough viscosity.

I was pleasantly surprised by the “relish” of diced kimchi at the bottom of the roll, and the bread had just the right amount of “toothiness” to make this a great sandwich. If you love sausages, you will love this version!

One of their specialties is the “Da KFC” served with a kimchi cornbread and pickled daikon radish for $8. A mix of both light and dark meat with a slightly sweet “BBQ” sauce on the bottom of the box, this tasted like a cross between Japanese karage and Chinese sweet and sour. It is an addictive version of KFC, and in this case, I have no qualms about being addicted:)

I thought the cornbread was half the box, but it turns out, it covered more chicken! There was no way to finish this after eating the ball and tasting the sausage, so I saved it to reheat for another meal.

Their menu offers Poutine and Spam, which are both low on my list of cravings, but if their versions are as good as what I’ve tasted so far, they may convert me.

Seoul Sausage Company on Urbanspoon

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